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The information on the Caledattorney website is general information for California residents only. Nothing on this site should be taken as legal advice or relied upon for any purpose. Contact California special Education Attorney Molly Watson for more information about legal services.

Molly Watson is available to meet with parents by Skype or FaceTime.

MW

Serving exceptional children & their families

MOLLY WATSON

530-273-2740

What are "Good" IEP Goals and Objectives?

Under the IDEA, a child's IEP must contain a statement of measurable annual goals, designed to meet the child's unique needs that result from their disability to enable them to be involved in and make progress in the general curriculum, and meet each of the child's other educational needs that result from the child's disability.  

Goals are based on the child's present levels

A child's IEP describes their present levels of academic achievement and functional performance. The present levels should describe the child's unique needs that result from their disability.

 

The present levels section of the IEP includes information as to the child's preacademic/academic functional skills, communication development, motor development, social/emotional/behavioral development, vocational skills, adaptive/daily living skills, and health. 

There should be a direct relationship between the annual goals and objectives and the needs identified in the statement of the child's present levels of academic achievement and functional performance.  

IEP goals must be measurable

Measurable annual goals allow parents and teachers to know how much progress the child has made since the performance was last measured. With measurable goals, you will know when your child reaches their goal.

What are objectives? 

Short-term objectives are steps that measure the child’s progress toward the annual goals in the IEP. When written correctly, short-term objectives provide your child's teachers with a roadmap and a clear mechanism to evaluate your child’s progress.

If you have questions or concerns about your child's IEP goals, consider hiring a special education attorney or advocate for help.